Emergency food

This building fell on the cars below.  A nice new building has replaced it, but it took years.  Luckily, no one died here.

This building in nearby Sherman Oaks fell on the cars below. A nice new building has replaced it, but it took years. Luckily, no one died here.

We’re just around the corner from the 20th anniversary of the Northridge earthquake.  During the horrible jolt and subsequent shaking, my husband threw himself over me while saying over and over, “It’s okay.” When the second round of violent shaking  began, he changed his tune to, “We’re going to die!”

We made it, though everything in our kitchen except one dish didn’t.  Even the bread maker and the microwave took it in the shorts.

Now we have a little stash of earthquake supplies, including backpacks we bought on sale after the school-time crush was over, bits of medicine and gauze, an emergency bucket-toilet that the kid thought was the greatest purchase we ever made, and emergency food and water.

Yesterday I made a trip to S.O.S. Survival Products — a great place for this stuff — and discovered something odd: There are NO emergency bars without gluten.  For the past three years, our emergency food has included only food I cannot eat. (For the rest of you, I heartily recommend the 2400 calorie bars and other smaller bars they sell.  They have a 5-year shelf life and taste great).

The solution for us will be food with a long shelf life that we will change out more often.  Costco has nut bars, peanut butter, and other grain-based cereals and bars that we can store for up to a year.  They also have gluten-free soups by the case that are inexpensive.  However, here are some links with more options:

Be sure to check ingredients and expiration dates.  Program your phone to let you know when it’s time to buy new supplies.

If you do nothing else, put together a few cans of food, a gallon of water or more per person, a small first aid kit and a plan.  What you really want is to get out alive, shut off the gas and have something to eat on hand — for three days or more.  Don’t forget medications, and don’t forget your pets too (we even had a fish bowl for our aquarium fish!).  Just in case, here is my most popular post: it’s about how long refrigerated/frozen food stays at a safe temperature without electricity.

I hope it never happens, but we’re told we’re in for a big earthquake at some point, and while I’m not an Armageddon-level prepper, I’m inclined to believe it.  If it does, for a good bit of time we’ll have no one around to help us except each other.  Plan accordingly.

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