Category Archives: eating well

Erin McKenna’s Bakery

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Erin McKenna’s Bakery

A splurge, but delicious.  Ask for ingredient list if you have FODMAP issues, because there is a lot of agave syrup in some items.  The good news is that you can look up the ingredients beforehand.  I wish this place had a public bathroom or we would have stayed for the coffee or tea.  They also have vegan soft serve with optional gluten free cone.  The atmosphere is very friendly (a discussion about Wow Airlines eventually involved the lady behind the counter, the gent talking about it, us, and a couple of bystanders) and there is a lot of foot traffic.  Refrigerate within 1.5 hours of leaving and keep the stuff there to retain the freshness.  (Unlike other baked goods, which tend to stale from being tossed into the fridge).  Also in New York and Orlando.

https://www.erinmckennasbakery.com/

  • Gluten Free, Vegan & Kosher
  • 236 North Larchmont Blvd,
  • Los Angeles, CA 90004
  • 855-GO-BABYCAKES
    855.462.2292
  • larchmont@erinmckennasbakery.com
  • Hours of Operation
  • Sunday-Thursday: 9am-9pm
  • Friday-Saturday: 9am-10pm
  • Kosher Certificate
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Three places to visit in Highland Park

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Order first while pondering the beauty (and I’m not just talking about that mustache). Also, get the baked goods for later first. You’ll see later why (spoiler: long lines!)

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Buckwheat pancakes with coconut! Blackberries! You won’t need to eat for the rest of the day! Seriously.

Kitchen Mouse (gluten free)

Monday – Friday  •  8am – 4pm
Saturday & Sunday  •  7am – 4pm
5904 N. Figueroa St.
Los Angeles, CA 90042  •  MAP
323.259.9555
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Mr. Holmes. Looks too fancy for you and me, but they’re NICE NICE NICE inside!!

Mr. Holmes Bakehouse (not gluten free)

101 S AVE 59
LOS ANGELES, CA, UNITED STATES

HOURS

7AM – 2:30PM WEEKDAYS / 8AM – 3:00PM WEEKENDS

Shorthand

HOURS

Everyday – 11am – 7pm

5028 York Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90042 USA

 

 

Hello weekend.

Eggs on toast, coastal cheddar, home fries, tea #heaven

One Less, One More

Here’s how I lost 30 pounds.  It’s advice I still have to remind myself to take sometimes (I’m talking to you, See’s Candies).  There’s no way I’m giving up chocolate.  Maybe there’s no way you’re going to give up your burger and fries.  Everyone feels differently about their food.

So this is what I do: I eat one less.  One less chocolate.  One less handful of chips.  One less cookie.  One less chocolate kiss (Not just one.  One less.).  One size down on the fries OR one less piece of cheese OR one less piece of bacon on the burger (I’m a vegetarian, but you see where I’m going with this).

You don’t have to deny yourself all of the joy of eating until you’re left with a sad (Veggie?  Beef?) patty wrapped in lettuce with no fries.  That’s the kind of behavior that leads to eating a box of cookies in the car of the grocery store parking lot under cover of darkness like a wide-eyed lunatic.  Ask me how I know.

After you’ve taken away one, add one more.  One carrot.  One apple.  One mandarin orange.  One Persian cucumber that you can eat mindlessly at your computer before lunch to fill you up just a little and take away the biting hunger.  Any watery fruit or vegetable will do nicely.

Have the one more before the one less.

It couldn’t hurt, and you won’t find yourself suffering or obsessing over it, driving your family or colleagues insane.  You won’t see results in a week, either.  But over time, you will see change, and you won’t even know how it happened.

This is how good eating habits are made.

A radical diet with beef, butter, and carbohydrates

It’s not very popular to take the middle ground when it comes to recommending a dietary pattern in America, but I’m standing by it.  We have a tendency to swing the pendulum too widely, with unintentional results. Continue reading

How to make brown rice — UPDATE

I’m always messing about with cooking — who knows, tweaking a bit might make it better, right?

This version makes rice that is fluffy and less starchy, which brings out the nutty flavor of the rice.

  • 1 cup of brown rice, rinsed and drained (removes excess starch)*
  • Bring 2.5 cups of water to a boil in a covered pot before adding the rice.*  Set a kitchen timer for five minutes and head off to open mail or tidy up.
  • Once the water boils, add the rice and give the pot a shake to distribute the rice evenly.*
  • Leave the lid almost closed, but with a little space to vent (or the rice will foam and create a mess)
  • Set the timer for 25 minutes and go live a little.
  • When the water is at the same level as the top of the rice, turn off the heat, close the lid and walk away for another 15 minutes.
  • Fluff and enjoy.  Makes about 3 cups.

*These are the only steps that differ from my original post, but oh, they make a difference.  In the first post, the rice goes from the bag to the pot of water before heating it all to a boil.  The result is more starchy, sticky rice (which is nice if you prefer it that way, or are making sushi).

 

How changing your diet is like the winter solstice

Image

The sunset on 12/20/13.

Today is the winter solstice — the start of the shortest day of the year.  According to the U.S. Naval Observatory, today we’ll see just 9 hours and 53 minutes of daylight.  In contrast, the summer solstice gave us 14 hours and 26 minutes of daylight.

That’s a lot of difference, right?

The amount of daylight we receive changes minute by minute, day by day.  Except during the period surrounding each solstice, and for periods of a couple of days where the amount of daylight remains the same, we either gain a minute of daylight a day, or lose one.  From today until June 21st of 2014, we will slowly, very slowly, gain daylight until we have amassed more than four extra hours of daylight a day!

What does that have to do with changing your diet?

Day by day and hour by hour, what we eat can change us, even if it’s by only a tiny change from what we normally consume.  If today you decide to eat one cookie instead of two, or take one piece of bread out of the restaurant basket instead of two or decide after overdoing it at a get-together not to keep overdoing it today out of self-loathing and a sense of defeat, you’ve inched a bit closer to success.  Eating better, exercising and taking care of ourselves are not about the big, dramatic moves, but about the little tiny ones that are less painful and therefore are read as less important.

Minute by minute and day by day, how will you be when the next solstice arrives?